Learn about Maori Artifacts - Important Notice

Under the New Zealand Protected Objects Act 1975, administered by the New Zealand Ministry for Culture & Heritage, the sale, trade, export and ownership of some Maori artefact are regulated Objects over 50 years old that also have Maori cultural significance must be inspected by Ministry for Culture & Heritage, and if significant the object will be allocated a "Y" number, a unique identification number. Artefacts that have a Y number can only be purchased by those that are registered collectors with the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. These collectors have a ‘registered number’. Y numbered artefacts cannot leave the country without written permission from the Ministry for Culture & Heritage. Those who are not registered collectors, and usually reside in New Zealand, can apply to the Ministry for Culture and Heritage to become one. There are no restrictions on the purchase of Maori items that have no Y number or Pacific Island or other artefacts from around the world. As this site is a price guide, and does not offer items for sale, the Y numbers applicable to any items on this site are not displayed..
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

Rare tattooing bowl. Very rare tattooing pigment bowl fashioned from a root ball, the naturally bent handle leads to a carved bowl with haehae and pataki designs and is highlighted with an abstracted tiki head with a protruding spilt tongue. Rich mid brown

Maori Tattooing Instrument. A very rare and fine instrument with a cylindrical wooden shaft adorned with fine spiral design carved into the end leading to a flattened rectangular top also finely carved with double haehae lines and dog-tooth notching. The e

Four bone Maori tattooing chisels various lengths between 3.5 and 6 cm.

Rare uhi ta moko-tattooing instrument, a very rare and fine instrument with a cylindrical wooden shaft adorned with fine spiral design carved into the end leading to a flattened rectangular top also finely carved with double h'h' lines and dog tooth notchi

Airtu Ahwito (Fungus). Considered sacred and used as an indelible dye in tattooing. Burnt to a cinder and mixed with dog fat and soot. What ever remained after each use was carefully preserved and handed down from father to Son Note: it is missing the stic

Airtu Ahwito. Considered sacred and used as an indelible dye in tattooing. Burnt to a cinder and mixed with dog fat and soot. What ever remained after each use was carefully preserved and handed down from father to Son Note: it is missing the stick with th

Airtu Ahwito (Fungus). Considered sacred and used as an indelible dye in tattooing. Burnt to a cinder and mixed with dog fat and soot. What ever remained after each use was carefully preserved and handed down from father to Son. Length 16 cm no Y number ne

Tattooing pigment pot, used in traditional Maori tattooing, this vessel would have held a mix of charcoal and water that would be applied with Uhi puru. Grey stone. Refer also to lot 42. Height 3 cm. Width 3.7 cm.

Three tattooing chisels, museum registered. Uhi puru or uhi matarau used to insert pigment and made from fine albatross bone, max length 5.3 cm. Width 1.2 cm.

Late 19th century carved wooden tobacco/ tattooing pot, the two carved seated figures holding a pot which has been carved with a tiki face. Height 15.5 cm. Length 25 cm. Depth 11 cm

Stone Container, Pumice Sharpener and two stone adzes stone container to hold either ink for tattooing or oil for lighting. D. 9 cm x 7 cm. Pumice sharpener with groove for blade. Length 9.5 cm. (no Y No. Allocated for above two items). adzes length 11.7 c

.