Learn about Bog Oak

Bog oak and other bog timbers originate in up to 10 metres deep, that were formed from forests where the natural growth had been overtaken by peat-forming plants from which the bogs were created, and which preserved the trunks and main branches of trees. The woods became very dark, almost like coal, stained by the tannins dissolved in the acidic water. Bog wood represents the early stages in the fossilisation of the wood, with further stages ultimately forming lignite and coal over a period of many millions of years. Bog wood is traditionally associated with Ireland but is also found in England and Scotland. Bog oak was popular in the 19th century for decorative jewellery and other small items, and a souvenir trade based in Dublin using bog wood was active during that time.
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

A rare Victorian Bog oak mourning brooch, five ivy leaves surrounding a celtic harp centre with an ivy leaf drop. Possibly Irish. Very minor damage to the edge of one ivy leaf. Gold cased with a safety chain.

A Bog oak brooch, crafted from a single carved hand clasping a wreath and swag of flowers, matt black finish, completed with pin.

Antique bog oak pin cushion with carved clover decoration, in a pot shape with metal handles, height 4 cm approx

Four various brooches including a cameo, sterling silver Victorian and carved bog oak brooch.

An antique portrait brooch, locket and others, comprising a bog oak brooch of oval shape with central porcelain plaque claw set, a lovely silver hallmarked portrait brooch of round form, detailed by a handpainted portrait of a young lady on ivory, framed b

An Irish bog oak bracelet, carved pierced cameos of churches on elasticated cord

Antique carved bog oak framed oval porcelain miniature, with jeweled decoration, 18 cm high

A Victorian bog oak locket and chain, the locket of carved scroll and foliate design suspended from a fancy link necklace of oval and rectangular links