Learn about Bookcases

The glass-fronted bookcase entered the English cabinetmakers' repertoire about the mid-17th century, and the bookcase in one form or another has been an indispensable part of the civilized person's home ever since.The 17th century bookcase tended to be a glazed cabinet from plinth to pediment, with square glass panes. The later Stuart period saw the introduction of the bureau bookcase or the secretaire bookcase, where the bookshelves were double-heightened above a desk or cupboard base. Early bureau bookcases often had mirror or blind-panelled door fronts, although these have frequently been replaced with clear glass panes. During the Regency period, the fashion arose for small cabinet bookcases, rarely more than three feet in height, which left the walls clear for hanging prints and pictures, known in the trade as a 'dwarf bookcase'. Such bookcases were sometimes open at the front, others had elegant brass-grille doors, backed by pleated silk. A bookcase without doors is known in the trade as an 'open bookcase'. The revolving bookcase was invented during the 18th century. more...

Learn about Biedermeier

Biedermeier, Empire and Art Deco have shared roots.

Often misunderstood, Biedermeier is a period 1815-1848 , that squarely sits between war and revolutions. It is a period that is not named after a royal personage, nor a fabulously talented designer or a gifted individual furniture maker. The name was coined AFTER that period passed. The name is made up of two words joined together: Bieder- ( meaning simple)and Meier ( a common German name) . It was first coined in a publication of a cartoon like character "Papa Biedermeier" illustrated in "The Flying Pages" a german periodical newspaper. He was a simple character and was quite oblivious to the world around him , a very decent chap with introspective tendencies, who didn't want to trouble anyone else.

Occupation and Empire

Under the French Imperial occupation by Napoleon's troops in Austria and the, as yet to be united, Germanic states in early 1800's , the French Empire style exerted much influence on architecture and design. However the Empire formality did not sit easy amongst the middles classes nor the farmers or workers . It reminded them of the foreign powers controlling their homelands. more...
3 item(s) found:
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

Biedermeier style two door bookcase, approx 193 cm high, 126 cm wide, 34 cm deep

A Biedermeier early 19th century mahogany library bookcase, with a moulded cornice above four glazed doors, the lower section with a secretaire drawer, above a pair of panel doors flanked by large panel doors supported on a plinth. 223 cm high, 140 cm wide

A Biedermeier mahogany bookcase, circa 1850, the moulded pediment with rounded corners over twin astragal glazed doors on shaped feet. Height 175 cm. Width125 cm. Depth 45 cm

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