Learn about Aboriginal Artefacts

Aboriginal art and artefact collecting goes back to early first contact times. In fact local Aboriginals around Sydney use to trade artefacts with visiting ships from the earliest days. Curio collecting has always been part of early exploration of the new world. Ceremonial adornment items that were made of perishable material were not preserved for future use and so early examples are very collectable. Early shields, clubs and boomerangs that were cherished as favourites and had developed a deep colour and patina are preferred. Historical items that were collected by early notable pioneers, explorers or anthropologists are of high interest to collectors. Some areas are collected because the artistic expression makes them more appealing when displayed. Production of artefacts has never ceased and are still made today for sale. Bark painting production started in mass in the 1950's and were sold via missionary shops. The earlier barks are more sought after. Now with many of the early artists and their roll in the maintenance of culture recognized, these barks are seen as important expressions of a past lifestyle.
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

An Aboriginal stone axe with old original binding and spinifex resin mount painted with ceremonial design. Central Australia. Length 38 cm

A pair of ceremonial spears, Groote Eylandt, Northern Territory, collected 1960's; finely carved and ochre painted designs. 128 cm each

A ceremonial boomerang, Central Australia (1930s), natural earth pigments on carved wood. 73 cm

An early ceremonial hooked boomerang, Northern Territory (early 20th century), natural earth pigments on carved hardwood. 84 cm

Three Aboriginal artefacts including a ceremonial spear tip, an early tourist boomerang and a feather ornament

An Aboriginal ceremonial spear, Tiwi Islands, Northern Australia 174 cm

Three fine ceremonial clubs, Bathurst or Melville Islands, Northern Territory, (circa 1930), carved ironwood and natural earth pigments, 50.5 cm; 54 cm; 45.5 cm (3). Provenance: Private Collection, Sydney

An important and rare ceremonial boomerang-club (lil-lil), North Queensland (circa 1900), carved hardwood, 80.5 cm high. Provenance: Private Collection, Victoria, This extraordinary and large ceremonial boomerang-club is carved of hardwood with an irregula

A rare aboriginal ceremonial dance wand, Central Australia natural earth pigments, feathers and natural fibres 114 x 60 cm

A rare aboriginal ceremonial dance wand, Central Australia natural earth pigments, feathers and natural fibres 87 x 60 cm

Ceremonial blade. Ochre and paint in geometric pattern. Length 76 cm

Aboriginal dance shield. Acacia, inscribed both sides. Collected central Desert 1950s. Length 77 cm

Ceremonial hat, with ostrich and lyre bird feathers, natural hemp and natural ochres, Melville Island. 45 cm high x 20 cm deep

Ceremonial Aboriginal fish spear. Collected Groote Eylandt 1950s. Old varnish over natural earth pigments. Length 71 cm

Three Groote Eylandt ceremonial items. Spear, clapstick and knife. Crudely carved hardwood with hatched decoration in ochre. Probable souvenir items, collected 1950s. Crack through knife 'Blade.'. Length 64 cm (spear)

Aboriginal kadaicha ceremonial shoes. Spun and woven hair, and feathers. Length 26 cm

An Australian Aboriginal ceremonial spear wooden, polychrome decorated. Length 117 cm

Aboriginal Desert hardwood ceremonial dance, spears's Kimberley Region, carved decoration, painted ochres. Lengths 127 cm and 143.5 cm

Old boomerang with incised decoration of ceremonial dancers - Flinders Ranges

Fine Aboriginal ceremonial boomerang, base of ochre with linear parallel dot pattern to front and back. Provenance: Julius Carlebach gallery, New York, 1958. Zanesville Museum of Art, USA. Width 69 cm.

Fine Aboriginal ceremonial boomerang, base of ochre with strong linear parallel lines to front and back. Provenance: Julius Carlebach gallery, New York, 1958. Zanesville Museum of Art, USA. Width 59.7 cm.

Fine Aboriginal ceremonial boomerang, base of light red ochre with white and yellow linear parallel line pattern to front and back. Portion of blade slightly split. Provenance: Julius Carlebach gallery, New York, 1958. Zanesville Museum of Art, USA. Width

Ceremonial spear, Arnhem Land, with cross hatch Ochre design, length 135 cm

A fine Central Australian ceremonial board, of wood in slender ovoid form decorated with incised esoteric motifs, pierced apex, ochre covering below smooth surface patina, 54 x 8 cm

Two Tiwi ceremonial spears, of wood decorated with polychrome ochres, Arnhemland, 225-227 cm (2)

Aboriginal ceremonial staff. Wound bands of natural string and feathers, with applied ochre. Length 190 cm

A fine West Australian ceremonial board, of wood, in slender ovoid form, the anterior decorated with curvilinear motifs in relief, pierced apex, ochre covering below surface patina, 41 x 6 cm.

Ceremonial cyclons, pair of sate with fluted design to one end of each Cyclon South Australian Lengths 31 and 43 cm

Ceremonial dance object, Northern Australian origin, elongated ovoid form with narrow waist, line and dot motif on a dark ground

Pair of painted ceremonial dance objects. Northern Australian origin. Natural earth pigments in cross hatch design. 37 and 35 cm

A Central Australian ceremonial boomerang, artist unknown, of wood in symmetrical form and ovoid section, decorated with stippled and figurative motifs in polychrome ochres, 45 x 5 cm

A Yolngu ceremonial boomerang, artist unknown, of wood in asymmetrical form and ovoid section, decorated with figurative and curvilinear motifs in polychrome ochres, Arnhemland, 77 x 8 cm

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