Learn about Cow Creamers

The popularity of cow creamers in the late 18th century and early 19th century is attributed to the Dutch or German silversmith John Schuppe, who worked in London, and may or may not have invented them. All the early cow creamers are silver, and the more familiar and affordable ceramic cow creamer, of which the unmarked Staffordshire models are best known, were not produced until the mid 19th century. Production ceased after the late 19th century, except for some collector editions. The creamers were designed to hold milk or cream, with mouth acting as the pourer, a hinged or removeable lid in the centre of the back to add or remove the liquid, and a curled tail which acted as the handle. Sometimes the lid has a finial in the form of a fly or bee.
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

Staffordshire 19th century cow creamer, with cover, 13 cm high approx.

A Berthold Muller sterling silver Cow creamer jug, import marks for Chester 1905. Height 8.2 cm. Length 14.5 cm. Weight 190grams

A large Continental silver cow creamer, circa 1900. 27 cm long, 600 grams

An old Staffordshire cow creamer, floral decoration to body, with oval floral decorated stand, with damage. 17 x 12 cm

A sterling silver Cow creamer with hinged wreath lid, bee finial and curled tail handle. Sold by Tessiers London. London 1977. Length 15 cm

Victorian Staffordshire Cow creamer. Black spotted, with gilt horns. Length 16.5 cm

Staffordshire Cow creamer. Brown spot decoration, with gilt horns on floral base. Some crazing. Length 17 cm

Late Victorian Staffordshire Cow creamer. Blue and white Willow style decoration, with cover. Length 16.5 cm

Staffordshire Cow creamer. Black matt glaze, with gilt horns on floral base. Length 16 cm

Late Victorian Staffordshire Cow creamer. Brown and black stippled, on floral base and with cover. Length 17 cm