Learn about Dish Rings

Dish rings were in use between about 1750 and 1800, and were designed to protect the table or sideboard surface from damage from a hot dish. They are usually about were mosty made in silver, and to a lesser extent Sheffield plate, of circular in shape with pierced, embossed and chased decoration to the in-curved side, the piercing also allowing the heat to escape. They are also known as potato rings, probably in deference to their supposed Irish origins. Manufacture of dish rings was revived in the late 19th century for several decades.
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

An Irish Edward VII sterling silver dish ring by Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Co., Dublin, 1908 with incurved sides repousse and chased with foxes, birds and dogs with large rococo scrolls and flower-heads and a vacant cartouche, with blue glass liner, 21 c

A Irish Victorian sterling dish ring by Charles Lamb, Dublin 1901 the incurved sides chased with a typical rococo foliage, scrolls and flower-heads, stags and cottages, vacant cartouches, with glass liner (cracked), 21 cm diameter. Provenance: Christie’s A

A silver dish ring, double-handled, plain; E.J.Houlston, Birmingham 1920. Width across handles 23 cm. Weight approx 230g

A sterling silver George III dish cross, 1784 London, with maker's mark for Hester Bateman, the dish cross with four radiating arms from a central spirit burner with movable scrolled brackets upon small circular feet, with fine beading to the burner, dish

An Edwardian Irish sterling silver dish ring, maker T.W, Dublin, 1909, Pierced throughout and applied with chased swags and cartouche, together with blue glass liner, 17.8 cm high, 20.6 cm diameter, 380 gms

A George III silver dish cross, London 1767 mounted on four splayed feet with central spirit burner decorated with scrolling and acanthus leaf motif through out 830gm, 31 cm high

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