Learn about Taxidermy

Taxidermy is the art of mounting or reproducing animals for display or study and in the past the word has been associated with large gloomy Victorian houses filled with stuffed animals. However in recent years, taxidermy has emerged from the shadows as a collecting area in its own right and in the United Kingdom there are now dealers who deal only in taxidermy. In Victorian times, taxidermists performed a valuable service, bringing wildlife into homes and allowing the inhabitants to see real birds and mammals at close quarters. They could also create trophies to provide mementoes of a good day's fishing or hunting. The value of taxidermy specimens is enhanced by the presence of an original label detailing when and where the specimen was obtained and by a trade label of the taxidermist, the most sought after being Rowland Ward of London. In assessing a taxidermied specimen, the potential buyer should carefully study the colours and brightness of the specimen, the eyes, the detail of the groundwork, style and condition of the case and the rarity of the species. Worm or insect eaten specimens, fading, and other damage substantially reduce the value of taxidermied items.

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These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

Group of mixed brown handbags, to include a vintage crocodile skin example, a beige lizard skin, a brown ostrich skin and two soft brown leather bags, (5)

Three various skin Handbags, including Jean Charles crocodile; and 2 others. Length 20 cm. (average)

Three various crocodile skin Handbags, including 2 di Croco; and one other. Length 28 cm. (average)

Large antique Papua New Guinea saltwater crocodile skull, teeth intact, c.1940's, 62 cm x 33 cm wide

Prehistoric crocodile fossil skull specimen with teeth in tact, Morocco region - said to be 60 million years old

Two Solomon Islands ceremonial knives & drum. One knife inlaid with mother of pearl (small loss). Carved Kundu, tall waisted form with carved snake & crocodile motifs. Reptile skin intact. 57 cm (longest). Height 80 cm (drum)

Natural History; group including tiger shark jaws, crocodile teeth, tortise shell and sea shells. 45+ items

Taxidermied Australian saltwater crocodile. Length 143 cm

Tanned taxidermy crocodile skin with tag/permit attached, length 2.5 cm

Antique saltwater full body crocodile specimen, 8ft long

A taxidermied small freshwater crocodile head, one glass eye replaced with a marble. Length 39 cm

Three wooden chests, one with faux crocodile skin cover, largest 34 cm high x 76 cm wide x 37 cm deep (3)

Taxidermied Johnson River crocodile. Fair/Good condition.

A taxidermied baby alligator mounted with its head raised and mouth slightly open and its tail curled around to its left, the eyes painted. Length 42 cm

An Australian crocodile skull, sold with Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission permit no 410067). Length 48 cm

A tanned Australian crocodile skin, sold with Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission permit no 358855). Length 270 cm

An Australian salt water crocodile together with a crocodile skull, full body salt water rogue crocodile specimen named Max caught in Innisfail north Queensland in 2010, the dried crocodile skull with full set of teeth. Both with permits. Length 365 cm

A fully mounted young crocodile, with open mouth mounted on a log, together with a fully grown crocodile skull,crocodile length 80 cm, skull length 31 cm.

A skull and jaw of a male fish-eating crocodile, late 19th, early 20th century. Depth 82 cm

Two head mounts of crocodilians, comprising an American alligator on oval wood shield, and a Malayan gharial, 59 cm and. Length 71 cm respectively, long respectively)

A crocodile skull with a conservation commission of the Northern Territory identification numbers and a taxidermy small turtle skull. Height 41 cm

A superb crocodile skull, a fine and attractive specimen of the skull of Crocodylus porosus (Schneider, 1801), a saltwater species; the largest of all living crocodiles, Northern Australia, 31 x 13 cm