Learn about Meat Covers

Meat covers, also known as dish covers, were designed for covering large platters in order to protect the food and retain the heat. They are usually ovel, matching the typical shape of tha platter, and vary in size from about 30 cm to 60 cm. They are topped by a reeded or foliate handle. While the surface of most are solid metal, there are examples where the outer surface is wholly or partly plated wire mesh. The covers were made in silver, Sheffield plate and silver plate and earlier silver examples date from the mid 1700s. Due to the amount of silver they contain, and consequently their cost, and value if sold for melt, silver covers are vastly outnumbered by plated examples. Sheffield plated examples date from the early 1800s while plated covers are generally from the Victorian era.
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

A French glass and gilt absinthe bottle, early 20th century; silver and gold mixed metal marks and lozenge mark of Baudet with deer at base of flask, a baluster shaped bottle with finely etched iris and foliage, the pull off dome cap and flask gilt washed;

Rare Australian silver emu diorama on blackwood stand, modelled with ferns and shrubs on rocky base, on a turned timber stand under glass dome. Unmarked. height overall: 23 cm. Provenance: Private Collection

A large silver oval meat-cover, by R & W Sorley, Glasgow, 1899. Provenance: Christie's Melbourne March 2001 lot 362

A George III sterling silver meat cover, makers mark William fountain, London, circa 1810, the high domed cover with ribbed trim above the base band and with a small scrolled handle to top displays an incised British coat of arms insignia to front and an a

Three graduated Victorian silver plate meat covers, each of campana form with engraved foliate decoration, the largest 51 cm wide.

.