Learn about Grandfather Clock

More correctly known as longcase clocks, these are clocks with a hooded pendulum, housed in a tall enclosed case, about seven feet high.

Introduced during the latter part of the 17th century, the longcase clock has remained popular to the present day.

As a general rule, the designs of the clock cases followed the stylistic developments of the past three centuries. Late 17th and early 18th century clocks inspired the cabinetmaker to extraordinary heights in the art of marquetry inlay, very often in the complex and intricate 'seaweed' patterns.

Other clocks were lacquered and decorated with gilded chinoiseries. Chippendale's designs followed the prevailing flowing lines of the Rococo, with quantities of scroll work, frets, pagodas, urns and rams' heads. Those of the Neoclassical period showed a return to simpler, straighter lines, often enhanced with panels of well-figured inlay, lines of stringing, swan-neck pediments and brass finials.

The finest clocks were often veneered in walnut or mahogany, but many country clocks made from honest oak have survived. more...
1 item(s) found:
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

A large flame mahogany longcase clock, early 19th century, with maker's mark of Jn hall Snr of Coventry, the clock with an arched broken pediment, a painted metal dial with Arabic numerals, a secondary dial and date aperture, with shell painted spandre

.