Learn about Jelly Mould

In past times, both savoury and sweet jellies were popular, and to improve the presentation of the jellies, ceramic jelly moulds were made from about 1750. The first jelly moulds were made from salt-glazed stoneware and were often in geometric shapes intended for a single serve. From about 1830, metal jelly moulds also came into use. Copper moulds were tinned on the interior to prevent poisoning. Glass jelly moulds became popular from the 1930s onwards. Nowadays most jelly moulds are plastic or aluminium.
These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only.

Two vintage glass jelly moulds together with a blue lidded canister & large art glass bowl

A Shelley white china castellated jelly mould. Height 15 cm

A collection of six ceramic and glass jelly moulds, 19th century and later, the largest 12.5 cm

A treacle glaze wheat sheaf decorated pottery jelly mould, Australian, late 19th century, 22.5 cm wide

Antique Georgian brass and iron trivet, copper and brass warming stand, brass spirit kettle on stand, and jelly mould (4)

Two various kitchen items, including early brass jam cooking pot; and Copeland jelly mould. Diameter 23 cm. (pot)

Box lot including Victorian jelly mould, Kalle & Co vase Christmas 1956, cup glass tray, etc

Two antique ceramic jelly moulds along with two other examples (4)

A Victorian period copper jelly mould, castle shape. Impressed marks. Length 15 cm

A small old copper castellated jelly mould, of oval shape, by H. Denham & Co. 1915. Length 11 cm

A Victorian white-glazed ceramic jelly mould, latter half 19th century, the spreading oval mould with corrugated sides forming a recumbent lion to the top. Height 10.5 cm

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