Learn about Bamboo Furniture

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, there was a revival of the taste for bamboo furniture featuring pseudo oriental styles. Bamboo furniture had been popular in Regency days, but the difference was that, while in Regency days the 'bamboo' legs and other members were generally simulated, that is, the wood was turned and notched, and then painted to look like bamboo, the later pieces were actually made of bamboo.

Bamboo frames often enclosed wickerwork covered wood panels. Numerous articles were produced, including hatstands, shelves, small tables, chests of drawers, (often surmounted by a mirror and a complex of small drawers), and overmantels liberally supplied with mirrors.

Bamboo furniture was mass-produced by several London firms. In a way, it was symbolic of the British Empire. Middle-class people felt comforted using furniture which they believed came from some oriental outpost coloured pink on the map. Some may even have been smug enough to imagine they were doing the natives a favour by patronizing their craft industries.

In recent years there has been a resurgence in the demand for bamboo furniture. more...
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A rare Regency elm rocking chair, with simulated bamboo carving throughout, plaited seat on a base United by stretchers on original rockers, in untouched condition

A George III style kauri wood occasional table of canted rectangular form on bamboo style stand. Width 56 cm. Depth 46 cm. Height 62 cm

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